Day Two – Wed., Aug. 18

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Detail on Tuesday Sessions
Detail on Thursday Sessions

8:30 – 9:30 am: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Current Drug Trends in Texas
Jessica Duncan Cance, MPH, PhD
RTI International
The purpose of this presentation is to discuss national, state, and local trends in substance misuse and associated consequences.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

  • Describe trends in substance misuse and associated consequences

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery  
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Building Recovery Ready Communities:
The Recovery Ready Ecosystem Model and Community Framework
Robert Ashford
Unity Recovery
Long-term recovery from substance use disorders (SUD) is often supported through various initiation points and pathways of recovery. The current session critically examines how communities across the United States are leveraging recovery science to deliver efficacious recovery support services to individuals across a diverse continuum of needs.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe how the recovery ecosystem model can fill the gaps in the community infrastructure.

•    Describe the different engagement methods of recovery support services and how such methods can benefit specific populations.

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
First Episode Psychosis: Symptoms & Evidence-Based Treatment
Christie Taylor, EdD, LPC-S
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Psychosis is a symptom of mental illness, which is distinguished by behaviors such as hallucinations, paranoia, delusions, and disordered thoughts and speech. First episode psychosis (FEP) usually begins in a person’s late teens to mid-twenties.

This workshop will discuss the evidence-based treatment modalities for FEP, with an emphasis on the coordinated specialty care (CSC) model. The CSC model incorporates multiple modalities including therapy, family and peer support, antipsychotic medications, and support for education and employment goals. This model has been shown to decrease rates of hospitalization and improve rates of education and employment.
Attendees will learn where CSC programs are located throughout Texas and how to connect eligible individuals with the program.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Recognize first episode psychosis (FEP), including its causes, symptoms, and methods for clinical identification

•    Identify effective treatment interventions for FEP, especially the coordinated specialty care model and its basic elements

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion and Social Determinants of Health
CEU CredCEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Groundwater Approach:
Educating About Systemic Racism
Bay Love, MBA, MPP
Racial Equity Institute, LLC
In this lively and participatory presentation, REI organizers will use stories and data to present a perspective that racism is fundamentally structural in nature. By examining characteristics of modern-day racial inequity, the presentation introduces participants to an analysis that most find immediately helpful and relevant.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

  •  Demonstrate that racism exists across systems.

•    Describe how controlling for socio-economic status leaves remaining racial gaps.

•    Define how systems cause disparities, regardless of people’s behavior or culture.

TRACK: Skills Building
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Safe Street Outreach
Justin McClenny, LCDC
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Session will cover basic strategies to enhance street outreach skills and build rapport with clients in the community. Discussion will include personal safety and how to address overdose or emergencies while working. Skills learned will include brief motivational interviewing, planning and implementing outreach activities.
Learning Objective(s)

Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe primary purpose and goals of outreach workers that includes roles and motivations.

•    Identify the different types of outreach

•    Identify common barriers to outreach strategies that includes outreach worker safety and outreach crisis mitigation

9:30 – 9:45 am: Break

9:45 – 11:15 am: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Supporting Transgender
and Non-Binary Youth
Joseph Gallego, MD
Montefiore Medical Center/Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Across the United States, there have been more anti-transgender bills introduced and laws passed just six months into 2021 than any other year in history; the majority of which legislation targets transgender and gender non-binary youth. Healthcare providers have the professional and ethical responsibility to recognize and meet the unique needs of transgender children and adolescents. In addition to a review of basic terminology, history, and epidemiology, this session aims to provide the learner with a more nuanced understanding of the ways in which healthcare providers can support gender diverse youth both in and out of the clinical context.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Characterize some of the needs of transgender and gender non-binary youth.

•    Describe some of the ways to provide support to transgender and gender non-binary youth.

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Understanding the Brain Wiring, Mapping, Development, and ACEs to Enhance Trauma-Informed Practices
Lisa Fredericksen
Understanding brain wiring, mapping and development helps explain why ACEs or the Pair of ACEs can have such a profound impact on a fetus, infant, toddler, child, adolescent or young adult’s brain development and therefore their physical and emotional health across a lifetime. These understandings can help enhance trauma informed practices, for when we understand where the brain was at developmentally when the ACEs or the Pair of ACEs occurred and what had gone into that brain’s wiring and mapping along the way, we can better appreciate the challenges that those who help and those who need help are facing. We can understand the need to go back to “that” place and basically help fill in the missing wiring or change the wiring and mapping that’s in place in order to improve that person’s physical and emotional health – the very quality of their lives.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Explain the concepts of brain wiring, mapping & development in utero through mid-20s.

•    Describe the connection between toxic stress-related physical and emotional health outcomes and experiencing ACEs or the Pair of ACEs during these developmental processes.

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
The New Science of Addiction Recovery
John F. Kelly, PhD
Harvard Medical School
For the past 50 years since the declaration of the war on drugs, a great deal has been learned about the etiology, epidemiology, typology, phenomenology, and acute care treatment of substance use disorders. With greater recognition that it can take many years to achieve stable remission, there has been a recent emphasis on understanding how individuals can achieve remission and stable recovery sooner. Much of the emphasis has shifted from addressing solely clinical pathology to understanding the social determinants of recovery – often referred to as recovery capital. This talk will describe where we have come from in the past 50 years since the birth of NIAAA and NIDA, describe the new science on addiction recovery, and discuss implications for a future national research agenda.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Define recovery capital and understand its significance to addiction remission

•    Describe the trajectories of change and well-being over the course of recovery.

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Trauma and Healing in the Lives of People with Intellectual Disability
Karyn Harvey, PhD
This workshop will explore the sources of trauma in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities, the effects of that trauma and key ingredients necessary for post-traumatic recovery. It will also explore the use of positive psychology towards the healing process.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify the sources of trauma common to many people with intellectual disabilities.

•    Identify the key ingredients to healing.

TRACK: Social Determinants of Health
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC
How Does Providing Evidence-Based Supported Employment Impact Social Determinants of Health?
Sandra Reese, BS
The IPS Employment Center, Westat
Individual Placement and Support (IPS) supported employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with serious mental illness work in regular jobs related to their work preferences. IPS is well defined by eight practice principles and a 25-item fidelity scale.

To date, 28 randomized controlled trials of IPS around the world show that on average 55 percent of IPS clients get jobs compared to 25 percent of clients receiving other types of vocational services. The IPS International Learning Community includes 25 states and 6 countries. This training will provide an overview of IPS model and discuss the disparity in employment rates and inadequate access to high quality supported employment services for people with mental illness. The group will discuss how employment is a social determinant of health and how work can improve people’s physical and mental health.
Learning Objective(s)

•    Identify at least two modifiable health concerns that can be impacted by employment.

•    List three reasons why access to high quality employment services benefits people’s well-being.

TRACK: Skills Building
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Staying Inside the Window of Tolerance: A Training on Managing Secondary Traumatic Stress and Building Resiliency
Leslie Anne Ross, PsyD
UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress (NCCTS)
This training provides an applied experiential opportunity for participants to understand the complexities of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) (including factors related to equity, inclusion, and diversity) and will utilize case-based discussion to enhance applied learning. The notion of the “Window of Tolerance” will be presented along with data-driven strategies participants may employ to manage STS and build resilience individually and in an organizational context.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Define skills to self-monitor STS responses and move inside the “window of tolerance” when dysregulated

•    Utilize peer and supervisory support strategies to address STS and build resilience

•    Apply evidence-based organizational strategies to improve others’ ability to manage STS and cultivate wellness

•    Develop a plan to create secondary traumatic stress informed individual and or organizational practices using evidenced-based assessment and response

11:15 – 11:30 am: Break

11:30 am – 12:30 pm: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Evolution of the Opioid Crisis and Impact on Health Outcomes Among People Who Use Drugs
Jon Zibbell, PhD
RTI International
Attendees will leave this session with a better understanding of the dynamics between the three waves of the opioid crisis and a fuller appreciation of how meth and stimulants are constituting the fourth wave. They will hear this from a leading researcher in the field and from a 30,000-feet view, complemented by a description of how this trend has manifested in particular communities, based on ethnographic research that consists of qualitative interviews with people who use drugs.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe evidence-based approaches to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with illicit drug use.

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Engaging Community Colleges in Prevention
Tammy Horton, MLA
Texans for Safe and Drug Free Youth
Although Community Colleges do not receive the media attention that the traditional four-year IHE’s in regard to alcohol misuse on campus, but that does not mean that the same troubles don’t exist for non-resident campuses. Our goal has been to identify those community college campuses that need help in making their policies more effective and to assist them in building strong substance prevention strategies customized to their campuses. TST has been able to partner with Tarrant County Community College District and North Central Texas College District to implement just that, an SBI event on campus to focus on those first-year students and practice prevention strategies on campus and in the community.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify those college campuses that need help in making their policies more effective and to assist them in building strong substance prevention strategies customized to their campuses

•    Describe the prevention needs of Community Colleges with a focus on first year students

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Youth Recovery Communities
Suzanne Alley, LPC-S, LCDC, RSS
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Begun as a pilot program in 2015, today there are 11 Youth Recovery Communities fully funded by Health and Human Services in Texas. Youth recovery helps youth with a substance use disorder or youth who want a substance-free environment that supports their life goals. Youth who haven’t received treatment for a substance use disorder can still benefit by joining a youth recovery community. The program supports long-term recovery and provides engagement and support from peers.

Youth can get a referral to a recovery community when they are in treatment or have completed substance use disorder treatment. Attend this session to learn what is available for youth and their families struggling with mental health and substance use disorder issues.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

• Describe the benefits of the Youth Recovery Communities (YRC).

• Explain how to provide referrals to YRCs.

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Building a ‘Virtual Presence’ Through Effective Engagement Strategies
Nancy A. Roget, MS, MFT, LADC and
Maryellen Evers, LCSW, CAADAC, CMFSW
Typically for in-person service delivery, both clinicians and peer support specialists must possess skills to create an environment that is private, distraction-free, and encourages patients or peers to discuss/disclose information that is important to positively impacting treatment outcomes and/or recovery goals. The same requirements exist for services delivered virtually. Using technology to facilitate clinical or recovery support sessions requires clinicians and peer support specialists to simulate real-time experiences (Hilty, 2002) that promote a therapeutic alliance (treatment) or connection (peer support). However, virtual service delivery requires some careful modification of the clinicians’ or peer support specialists’ skills to ensure engagement occurs and positive working relationships are developed. This workshop will highlight how to develop a virtual presence that leads to building empathy, trust, and mutual respect.
Learning Objective(s)
At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Define the term engagement and how it relates to virtual service delivery
  • Identify the factors that contribute to the development of a ‘virtual presence’
  • Name the three critical factors that help build an alliance

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Equitable and Culturally Responsive Family Preservation and Intervention Services for Families Involved in the Child Welfare System
Judge Aurora Martinez Jones
126th Civil District Court – Travis County
This session will discuss the current landscape in the child welfare system as well as exacerbated challenges and newly emerging innovations to provide equitable and culturally responsive services and interventions to children and parents involved in the child welfare system. The Travis
County District Court Judge responsible for child welfare cases in that county will discuss and explore how a multi-systems and community engagement collaboration has led to a data driven approach to effective change and improvement in the local outcomes in the child welfare system.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe how the intersection of multiple systems impact the child welfare system and outcomes for families in Texas.

•    Identify ways in which their own system may be causing unintended consequences for children and families in the child welfare system

•    Explain how local community collaboratives can re-imagine child welfare to better serve children and families.

•    Describe the most difficult challenges exacerbating inequitable outcomes.

12:30 – 1:45 pm: Lunch Break

1:45 – 3:00 pm: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Wonderful World
of the Transgender Community
Josephine Tittsworth
Texas Equity Committee for GLBT
In a 2017 study conducted by The Williams Institute of UCLA, 27% of youth reported being identified as gender nonconforming. 1.4 million Americans identify as transgender; 150,000 are youth ages 13-17. 70 percent of transgender people report harassment in public restrooms and changing rooms; 9 percent report physical attacks. This session will present informational instructions on the transgender community. The presentation will address advocating for policy change in Texas Schools and provide for open floor discussions.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Recite basic transgender terms

•    Describe the efforts to change policies in school addressing transgender youth

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
When Drinking Causes Secondhand Harm to Others:
Secondhand Drinking – It’s a Problem
Lisa Fredericksen
Secondhand Drinking is a term to describe the negative impacts of a person’s drinking behaviors on others. Drinking behaviors include crazy, convoluted accusations; verbal, physical or emotional abuse; neglect; inconsistent behaviors; driving while impaired; lying, cheating, stealing and repeatedly breaking promises to stop or cut down. Nearly 80 million Americans are directly affected by secondhand drinking. These are the husbands, wives, moms, dads, children, siblings, grandparents and significant others. That’s five times the number of people whose drinking causes secondhand drinking. Yet very little is understood about the profound toxic stress-related physical and emotional health and quality of life consequences to those who experience secondhand drinking.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Explain the concept of secondhand drinking and help clients/patients identify its presence with a single question screen.

•    Describe the connection between secondhand drinking and toxic stress-related physical and emotional health and quality of life outcomes.

TRACK: Social Determinants of Health
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Shifting the Paradigm Toward Social Accountability in Healthcare
Bonzo Reddick, MD, MPH, FAAFP
Mercer University School of Medicine
Most medical schools and residency programs educate their learners about the social determinants of health, but there is little guidance about the ideal quantity or format for education on social contributors to health outcomes. One particular social determinant of health—a patient’s race or ethnicity—is mentioned frequently, but with a heavy emphasis on supposed biological or genetic differences between different races and cultural groups. For example, learners are taught that Asian patients have higher rates of gastric cancer or that Black patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, but individuals rarely discuss that these differences are likely caused by social and environmental factors.

Moreover, when the issue of racial and ethnic differences are discussed, healthcare groups patients into large clusters based on phenotypes which do not have a biological or genetic basis and have little to no scientific evidence to support them. Dr. Reddick will present a new paradigm that asserts that race-based medicine and a social determinants of health approach to healthcare are diametrically opposed. Additionally, this paradigm integrates social determinants of health into the entirety of medical education, as we can paradoxically use the traditional biological focus to teach about the social factors that impact patients’ health.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Define and differentiate the following terms: Implicit bias, Explicit bias, Stereotyping, Prejudice, Individual racism, Systemic racism.

•    Describe how racism can effect patients’ healthcare and contribute to health disparities.

•    Describe at least one way in which you, as an individual, can lessen the impact of racism on health outcomes.

TRACK: Skills Building 
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Implementing Integrated Care: Models and Approaches for Success
Samantha Holcombe, National Council for Behavioral Health
Alicia Kirley, National Council for Behavioral Health
As the healthcare system increasingly shifts focus towards managing the health of populations, integrated care has increasingly been embraced as a solution for addressing practices that promote siloed care for individuals with comorbid conditions. However, integration can take many forms. During this session, we will explore the connections between various definitions and models of integration – including Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinics and the Continuum Framework for General Health Integration in Behavioral Health – and talk practically about the common core components of integration and strategies for success.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Define the various levels and types of integration between mental health, substance use and primary care

•    Identify key frameworks and models for integration and how they align, including SAMHSA’s Levels of Integrated Care, Continuum Framework for General Health Integration in Behavioral Health, and the Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic model

•    Recognize core components of successful integration and best practices in implementation, such as pathways for partnership and team-based care approaches

TRACK: Trauma-Informed Care/ Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Becoming the Inhaler: Interrupting the Progression Toward a Disorder – Part 1
Karen Williams, MSSW
Williamsgroup
Psychological distress and trauma behave much like an acute asthma attack, creating physical, psychological, and behavioral chaos. These immediate, automatic reactions are survival instincts/reflexes that are designed to serve as a warning to the individual and to observers that something is amiss and needs an immediate intervention. If left unchecked, this “attack” can have serious consequences. We all know that an inhaler does not cure asthma, but it reduces the body’s distress response, lessens the discomfort, and prevents the damage from getting worse. From a psychological view, we may not be able to prevent the adversity in children’s lives, nor their immediate chaotic reactions, but we can reduce the body’s automatic survival reflexes – just like an inhaler does. We can reduce the discomfort and prevent the damage from getting worse, and we can prevent the escalation of symptoms and prevent a mental health disorder from forming. The session includes specific distress/trauma reducing techniques.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Name the most important finding from NRC’s Report.

•    Describe at least one trauma management technique to use, model & teach others

3:00 – 3:15 pm: Break

3:15 – 4:45 pm: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Young-Adult Voice: Youth and Young Adult Partnerships and Advisory as a Path to Equity and Cultural Competency
Cory Morris MSW and De’Keona Jones
Center for Youth Mental Health, Dell Medical School
This session enlightens participants on the key ways to incorporate community (particularly adolescent and emerging adult) voice and to build effective youth and young-adult partnerships. The mental health and health fields have a growing investment and interest in learning from those served by such systems. Not only does this enhance service and supports, but it can help to eradicate equity barriers and shape innovative, engaging, and effective community-based supports.

Adolescents and young adults have particularly unique developmental, health, and mental health needs; they are also far too often disenfranchised by rigid child & adult provider structures. Advisory processes that provide a forum for voice, input, and partnership are critical to shaping supports that reach young people. The Center for Youth Mental Health, at Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin, is currently supporting the building of a pro-active emerging-adult advisory council, to empower young people to build advocacy processes to help shape and inform integrative health and mental health systems, and, in this session, will share the wisdom and insights from young-adult members of this council.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Recognize the key fundamentals to building forum for youth and young adult voice in different capacities that are realistic and practical

•    Identify simple, practical steps to incorporate youth and young adult input into service systems

•    Apply strategies of incorporating voice into practice in diverse service systems

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
It’s Both Sides of the Coin:
Addressing the Role of First Responders in Diverting Individuals with Behavioral Health Issues from the Justice System and Promoting First Responder Wellness and Resiliency
Moderator: Jennie M. Simpson, PhD, Forensic Director, HHSC
Panelists:
Chief Stan Standridge, MPA, San Marcos Police Department
Annie Burwell, LBSW, Mobile Outreach Director, Williamson County Emergency Services
Sergeant Jose Gomez, Harris County Sheriff’s Office
B.J. Wagner, MS, Executive Director, Caruth Police Institute, University of North Texas at Dallas and Senior Fellow at Meadows Mental Health Policy Institute
Law enforcement and emergency medical professionals are frontline responders to mental health crises and behavioral health emergencies. They play a critical role in diverting individuals with mental health and substance use disorders at-risk of arrest from the criminal justice system. However, too often, their behavioral health needs go unaddressed. In this session, both sides of the coin will be explored. Panelists will share innovative programs to reduce and prevent justice involvement for individuals with mental and substance use disorders as well as discuss first responder wellness and resiliency.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

  • Describe how first responders prevent and reduce justice-involvement for people with mental health and substance use disorders.
  • Discuss the wellness, and resiliency needs of first responders.
  • Describe innovative programs currently utilized by some jurisdictions.

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
How Texas is Addressing the Opioid Crisis – Texas Targeted Opioid Response
Kasey Strey, Kaleigh Becker, Jose Nicolas Flores, Rocky Payne
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
The Texas Health and Human Services, Texas Targeted Opioid Response team will present its statewide Prevention, Treatment, Recovery, and Integrated program services – highlighting innovative projects and opportunities to get involved.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe how Texas is taking action to address the opioid crisis

•    List ways to drive community involvement to address community needs and implement strategies across the continuum of care

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Promoting and Sustaining Mental Health Wellness for People with IDD and Autism
Luke Reynard, Northeastern Family Institute, and Karen Weigle, Center for START Services Institute on Disability
This presentation will provide an overview of the presentation of persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (including autism) and co-occurring mental health conditions as well as evidence-based strategies for wellness. Community-based intervention strategies will be discussed to demonstrate both the need and impact of addressing the needs of this special population.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify how mental health symptoms may present differently in persons with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) and autism

•    Identify systemic impacts of providing effective mental health and wellness supports to people with IDD and autism.

TRACK: Social Determinants of Health
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Housing and Health
Ann Denton, MEd
Ann Denton and Associates
Housing is a key social determinant of health. Having a place to live predicts better health outcomes. For people with mental illness, substance abuse and people experiencing homelessness, the provision of housing with supports provides better health outcomes AND fosters real recovery. Session will include an overview of housing resources (federal, state and local sources) and tips and tools for accessing those resources. The session will also focus on successful housing approaches for people with behavioral health disorders and those experiencing homelessness. Permanent Supportive Housing resources and implementation issues will be discussed, including how to support choice for clients in a resource-poor environment. Also, Rapid Re-Housing, Recovery Residences and other approaches are included and those discussions will include tips for development and implementation. A highly interactive session is planned.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe at least three aspects of the link between housing and health.

•    Define at least two successful housing approaches for people with behavioral health disorders.

•    List at least five potential resources for housing.

TRACK: Trauma-Informed Care/Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Becoming the Inhaler: Interrupting the Progression Toward a Disorder – Part 2
Karen Williams, MSSW
Williamsgroup
In 2015, the Treatment Advocacy Center estimated that people with untreated mental illness were 16 times more likely to be killed during a police encounter than other civilians. Another study from 2009-2012, discovered that “one in five (21.7%) legal intervention deaths were directly related to issues with the victim’s mental health or substance-induced disruptive behaviors.” Surveys by the National Alliance on Mental Illness found that people in a mental health crisis are more likely to encounter police than to get medical attention, resulting in two million people jailed every year. A growing number of jurisdictions are adopting a team approach to these incidents, in which mental health professionals can help de-escalate the situation, with trained police protection in support. These programs should be studied for their effectiveness and design to help determine how the role of the police and first responders might be modified when mental illness is involved in an emergency call.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe how to expand access to behavioral health treatment during first responder incidents involving MH and SD.

•    List types of training to prepare first responders when responding to incidents involving MH and SD.

•    Examine innovative programs currently utilized by some jurisdictions.