Day Three – Thurs., Aug. 19

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Detail on Tuesday Sessions
Detail on Wednesday Sessions

8:30 – 9:30 am: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Evolving Role of Peer Support in Healthcare
Chacku Mathai
Center for Practice Innovations at Columbia University
As peer support becomes more commonly understood across the country and in Texas, there are a number of opportunities and challenges that peer supporters, families, organizations, systems, and policy makers continue to face. This presentation will review the evolution of peer support implementation since the early 1980’s, what peer support faces in today’s climate, and what drivers need to be understood to address the role of peer support in the future of healthcare in our communities.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify 1-2 important milestones in the evolution of peer support

•    Describe the role of lived experience and social identity in pursuing racial equity in healthcare

•    Identify 1-2 opportunities and/or challenges facing peer support

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Utilizing Data Collection Tools to Identify and
Address Emerging Trends
Shameela Ali, MPH
Texans for Safe and Drug Free Youth
Evaluating processes and programs helps coalitions have a better understanding of where to focus already-limited resources. Data play a large role in evaluating community-based prevention efforts and help create informed decisions regarding strategies and capacity building. Creating valid and standardized, user-friendly screening tools for data collection is an essential step in the evaluation process, especially when determining a strategic approach for addressing existing and emerging substance use prevention issues, however, it is a skill that many have not had a chance to practice. Using Texans for Safe and Drug Free Youth (TxSDY’s) recent work to develop screening tools in response to changing alcohol to go policies during COVID-19 as an example, this presentation will walk participants through the survey development and implementation processes.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify the role data collection can play in selecting strategies and telling a story (demonstrated through a real-world example)

•    Utilize standardized tools and experts (community partners, evaluators, epidemiologists, etc.) to collect data, address emerging issues, and inform future decisions

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Improving Lives of Children in the Child Welfare System
Cortney Jones
Change 1
A former foster youth, Cortney Jones has advocated for youth and alumni in the foster care system for the past 15 years. After spending 10 years in foster care system at 18, she was suddenly on her own and realized she had no direction. She decided to attend college earning her bachelor and master’s degree and turned to advocacy. By creating the organization Change 1 she is seeking to improve the capacity of youth-led and youth-serving institutions and engage young people, their families and communities so that youth can reach their full potential.

Cortney knows that foster youth are more likely to go through adverse childhood experiences and trauma that compromise their healthy development and contribute to lifelong issues. This often influences their cognitive, emotional, physical and executive functioning. with poor health, poor outcomes, and early death. These early life experiences of trauma and adversity undermine the educational attainment of foster youth by preventing their ability to succeed academically. Evidence-based and trauma-informed policy can improve academic outcomes for young people in the foster care system, which in turn will support their long-term health, development, and well-being over the life course.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

• Describe three ways to reduce the rate of child placement in the welfare system

TRACK: Skills Building
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
HIV
New Paths of HIV Prevention Part 1
Max Laffend, MSW, LSW
Hudson Pride Center
By the end of this course, participants will be able to describe national, and local trends related to HIV/AIDS specific to developments in HIV prevention medication. This workshop will be comprehensive in addressing ways of preventing HIV infection, including bio-medical interventions, combined with behavioral health and traditional prevention methods.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe HIV prevention options that include medication for clients.

•    Identify practical steps for accessing biomedical interventions for preventing HIV that includes examples of community mobilization

9:30 – 9:45 am: Break

9:45 – 10:45 am: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Special Topic
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
What Impact Does a New Congress to New Administration Have
on Behavioral Health Policy?
Chuck Ingoglia
National Council for Mental Wellbeing
The behavioral health industry continues to adapt its service offerings in response to the emergence of the novel coronavirus. How will a new Congress and Administration help or hinder continued access to behavioral health services? This session will answer this question as well as provide a national perspective on trends.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe the major federal policy changes that have occurred related to the delivery of mental health and SUD treatment.

•    Recite the challenges that behavioral health organizations face when implementing delivery methods.

•    Discuss future of temporary federal policy changes related to tele-health, competition and value-based care within our sector.

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Syringe Services Programs: A Vital Tool for Texas
Lucas G. Hill, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP
Director of the UT Pharmacy Addictions
Research & Medicine (PhARM) Program
Syringe services programs (SSPs) are endorsed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the most effective approach for preventing transmission of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus transmission among people who inject drugs. SSPs have a unique ability to engage marginalized populations at high risk for overdose death and provide them with naloxone, fentanyl test strips, and other essential services. This session will review the evidence supporting SSPs, summarize current barriers to their operation, and describe the role they should play in supporting the health of Texans going forward.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe the services provided by syringes services programs (SSP)

•    Summarize the evidence supporting SSP implementation

•    Discuss the role SSPs should play in supporting the health of Texans

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
COVID: Coping with Grief and Loss
Karyn Harvey, PhD
This pandemic affected us all but, in particular, people with intellectual disabilities were greatly impacted. This workshop will explore ways in which we can help the people we support to deal with the aftermath of loss. Grief and supporting others through it and several tools that can be used to facilitate this process will be discussed.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Recognize the patterns of grief that are universal.

•    Describe how to use “The Goodbye Book” to help people work through their grief.

TRACK: Social Determinants of Health
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
HOMES: Pioneering Medication Assisted Recovery Housing Best Practice
Moderator: Jason Howell, RecoveryPeople
Panelists: Colin Alphonso, TROHN, Sheryl McCurdy, UTHouston Health Science Center, Phil Owens, Communities for Recovery, Jenn Priddy, Thrive United
Take a first look at Project HOMES, a Texas Health and Human Service Commission funded project that is establishing and researching recovery housing that is designed to support persons with an opioid use disorder who are in recovery and are undergoing medication assisted treatment. This project is historic. While medication assisted treatment is an evidenced based treatment for opioid use disorder and recovery housing is an evidenced based approach to supporting recovery, best practices that combine the two have not yet been established.
Learning Objective(s)

Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

• Describe the research protocols that are being utilized in Project HOMES

TRACK: Skills Building
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
HIV
New Paths of HIV Prevention Part 2
Max Laffend, MSW, LSW
Hudson Pride Center
By the end of this course, participants will be able to describe national, and local trends related to HIV/AIDS specific to developments in HIV prevention medication. This workshop will be comprehensive in addressing ways of preventing HIV infection, including bio-medical interventions, combined with behavioral health and traditional prevention methods.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe HIV prevention options that include medication for clients.

•    Identify practical steps for accessing biomedical interventions for preventing HIV that includes examples of community mobilization

10:45 – 11 am: Break

11:00 – 12:30 pm: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Overcoming Stigma and Generational Trauma in Behavioral Health
Deborah Antich
Deborah Antich Consulting
Overcoming Stigma and Generational Trauma in Behavioral Health is a session designed for those working in the field to have a deeper understanding of how generational, cultural and genetic factors play a role in Mental and Behavioral Health. The session will:

•   support multiple roles within an organization;

•   include audience involvement and provide engaging exercises;

•   examine how family and cultural dynamics and environments can affect behaviors – both positively and negatively – and what we can do to address them, in real time, for the community members we serve.

The purpose of the session is to give a clear, realistic picture of how stigma and generational trauma affect everyone differently, creating opportunities for participants to see themselves in others.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•      Describe how stigma and generational trauma affects everyone differently.

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Teen Mental Health First Aid
Amy Anderson, Hill Country MHDDC
Amy Sanders, North Texas Behavioral Authority
National surveys and other studies show that young people will turn to their friends for support before a parent, sibling, significant other, teacher, online service, professional, or school service. Half of all individuals who experience a mental illness in their lifetime will have their first episode by 18. It is estimated that one in four individuals who are 16- to 24-years-old will experience a mental illness in any 12-month period. Yet, many adolescents have poor mental health literacy and lack skills in providing optimal Mental Health First Aid to peers. This could be improved with training to facilitate better social support and increase appropriate help-seeking among adolescents with emerging mental health problems. Attend this session to learn about teen Mental Health First Aid (teen MHFA), a new initiative of Mental Health First Aid International.
Learning Objective(s)
After taking Teen Mental Health First Aid, students will be able to:

•    Describe how after taking Teen Mental Health First Aid students can help themselves or struggling peers.

•    List two statistics regarding youth struggles with mental health.


TRACK: Treatment and Recovery
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in the Residential, Outpatient and Recovery Continuum
Douglas Denton, MA, LCDC
Homeward Bound, Inc.The session will review the current Opioid crisis the United States is experiencing and the development of medications to address the addictive properties of opioids. The presenter will discuss the transition from traditional medications for withdrawal from opioids to current practice standards. He will review data for relapse and recovery with two cohorts of pre and post MAT experience.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•   Identify medications used for Opioid withdrawal, detoxification and maintenance.

•   Describe the mechanisms of action for buprenorphine and natraxone.

TRACK: Special Populations
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC
Working with Traumatized Youth with IDD
Megan A. Mooney PhD
Children who have intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are at disproportionate risk for experiencing a wide variety of traumatic experiences. This presentation will review these risk factors along with common impacts of trauma on children’s cognitive, behavioral, and emotional functioning. Ways to adapt and modify treatments for children with IDDs who have experienced trauma will be described.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify common emotional & behavioral reactions in children and teens exposed to trauma.

•    Discuss disproportionate risk for children with IDD to experience trauma.

TRACK: Social Determinants of Health
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Racial Equity, Structural Competency, and Health Activation
Chacku Mathai
Center for Practice Innovations at Columbia University
Health starts where we live, learn, work, and play. Explore and examine the role of structural competency and social determinants of health in your work towards increasing health and wellness outcomes and eliminating the health inequities experienced by individuals, families and communities. This highly interactive training program increases practitioner and administrator understanding of structural competency and offers opportunities to explore the relationship between our health conditions and the social determinants of health to improve engagement, cultural and structural formulation, and health activation outcomes.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify 1-2 characteristics of cultural and structural engagement opportunities.

•    Describe 1-2 strategies for increasing understanding of structural attitudes and bias.

•    Describe the differences between cultural and structural formulation.

TRACK: Special Topic
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Welcoming, Integrated Systems and Services for People with Co-Occurring MH and Substance Use Conditions
Kenneth Minkoff, MD
This presentation outlines six evidence based practice principles and associated interventions that can be applied in any MH or SUD program within available resources to implement appropriately matched integrated MH/SUD services to the co-occurring population that is the expectation in that setting. In this framework, all programs and all persons providing help can become welcoming, recovery oriented, trauma informed and co-occurring capable.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify and apply the six principles of best practice integrated MH/SUD interventions inside their work or their program

•    Identify the population of people with co-occurring disorders that their program(s) expect to serve

•    List next steps for improving integrated MH/SUD services in the program(s).

12:30 – 1:45 pm: Lunch Break

1:45 – 3:15 pm: Concurrent Sessions

TRACK: Diversity and Inclusion
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Just Say “Know:” Impacting Social Determinants of Health by Increasing Developmental Assets in Youth
Mitchell Moore, LCDC, ADCII, ACPS
MBM Endeavors LLC
Social determinants of health are conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play that affect a wide range of health risks and outcomes. Adolescents are at a higher risk for many preventable health problems, including substance use disorders. We can help adolescents stay safe and healthy by incorporating social determinant prevention strategies and teaching positive health behaviors. This workshop will help Prevention Specialist “connect the dots” between the social determinants of health and the prevention of substance use disorders.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

• Identify social determinants to health

• Identify social determinant prevention strategies to build assets and resiliency in youth

TRACK: Prevention
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Pimpology in Practice: State v. Glen Dukes
Kirsta Melton, JD, MPA
For five years Glen Dukes preyed upon the drug addicted women engaged in prostitution on the east side of San Antonio. Once they had been persuaded to join “Team Glen” they were beaten, choked, drugged, raped and regularly threatened with death. Glen controlled every aspect of their lives including their food, sleep, clothing, hair and nails. When that control seemed threatened Glen murdered several women and forced “his team” to help clean and dispose of the bodies as yet another way to bind them to him. After a grounding in trafficking basics, the case study will empower participants to identify risk factors in previously unseen vulnerable populations, center prevention programs around risk factors, recognize the red flags of trafficking and help obtain trauma informed care for a survivor. Learn how seeking justice for victims is a collaborative and uniquely tailored process that requires honest assessment of the gaps and barriers that victims face and the willingness to change policy and practice to see, serve and empower those victims for the future.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify what trafficking is and isn’t

•    Articulate vulnerabilities of adult victims of trafficking

•    Assess common system barriers to victim access to services

TRACK: Treatment and Recovery 
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Peer Services 101
Noah Abdenour
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Peer recovery services (PRS) are community-based services for individuals with a mental illness or substance use disorder, and consist of activities that promote recovery, self-determination, self-advocacy, well-being, and independence. Peer recovery services are individualized, recovery-focused, and based on a relationship that supports a person’s ability to promote their own recovery. Peer recovery services promote self-directed recovery by assisting an individual and promoting trauma informed care and diversity competence, encouraging self-direction, and advocating for informed choice. Attend this session to learn the basics of Peer Support: What it is, isn’t, and why it’s important.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe how peers are being effectively used in clinical settings and in community settings.

TRACK: Special Populations 
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Supporting People with MH and IDD
Valerie Murrieta, Mary Bishop, Tara Devilbliss, Laura Golden, Valerie Krueger, Beth McClary, Terry Wendling
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
Individuals with a dual diagnosis of intellectual and developmental disabilities and mental health (IDD/MH) benefit from individualized supports that enhance and promote community involvement and autonomy. This presentation will include integrated approaches to best support people who have a dual diagnosis.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Describe person centered practices when supporting people with a dual diagnosis.

•    Identify new strategies that promote the integration of IDD and MH Services that will benefit those with a dual diagnosis.

TRACK: Skills Building
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Shattering the Norm and Changing Lives with SET Therapy
Dana Shepard Cardwell, LPC, LCDC
Cardwell Therapy Center
So what is SET Therapy? Spiritual (Mindfulness, meditation, setting a daily intention), Exercise (Yoga, musical movements, and mind body movements), and Talk (CBT, EMDR, DBT) while discussing positive coping skills to use in daily life to decrease symptoms of depression, anxiety, ADHD, addiction, and pain. About 70 percent of all Americans have been subjected to some form of violence: witnessing it, being subjected to it, verbal abuse, bullying, etc.

This affects the Amygdala: the smoke alarm in the mind leading to fight, flight, or freeze. SET Therapy can be used in clinic and for Tele-Health to help calm the amygdala and leave teens or adults with positive coping tools to use in their daily lives. It helps to make sense of the trauma by recognizing the trauma is in the past. Living in the present is the way to have a better quality of life by learning how acceptance of self and others leads to a productive community with less disparities. The overall goal is contentment.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify over 5 Alternatives in therapy related to the mind and body.

•    Describe Neuroplasticity and how we can rewire our brains. A small quiz will be given to test for understanding at the end of the session and during the presentation.

TRACK: Special Topic
CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Self-Care for Helping Professionals
Jondell Lafont-Garcia, MA, LPC and Holly Fullmer
Texas Health and Human Services Commission
The past couple of years have presented unique challenges for everyone (understatement of the century… right?). We have experienced long-term collective trauma, without a guidebook on how to cope. As a helping professional, not only are you trying to navigate the world around you, but you are also trying to help others navigate it.

The work you do requires a ton of caregiving, but who’s taking care of you? Self-care is especially
important for helpers – we cannot help others without first taking care of ourselves. We are needing self-care tools more than ever right now. Self-care is intentional, builds resiliency, improves our ability to cope, and helps us foster connections.
Learning Objective(s)
Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

•    Identify how self-care promotes mental wellbeing

•    Identify potential barriers to self-care

3:15 – 3:30 pm: Break

3:30 – 5:00 pm: Closing Keynote

CEU Credits: CME, CNE, SW, CHES, CPH, LMFT, LPC, Lic Psych, LCDC, CPS/CFP, Cert. Peer Sup.
Ethics
Creating the Narrative & Closing Remarks by HHSC Management
Rinku Sen
The Narrative Initiative
Individuals often spend 80 percent of the time talking about the problem and 20 percent of the time talking about the demands and the solutions and the actions needed to get to those solutions. It’s time to flip that, according to Rinku Sen. As Executive Director of the Narrative Initiative, Ms. Sen and her team support an emerging field of narrative change practitioners, researchers and trainers. The group is exploring key openings where narrative can align movements, commissioning landscape assessments and research, and organizing strategy labs and global convenings to drive deeper collaboration.

Every program and investment is designed to have long-lasting impact. Referring specifically to racial justice, Sen described how activists cultivate a “racial lens” to understand how an issue impacts different demographics. She believes the goal of developing such a lens is not to become “color-blind” to race, but rather to confront how racial disparities are intertwined with social inequity and help communities that are disproportionately affected. Being ‘anti’ is not enough, says Sen. “We can’t just tear something down. We have to build something else in its place. And what we’re building is racial justice, which I find to be a more sustainable destination. Think of anti-racism as steps along the path, but think of racial justice as the actual destination.
Learning Objective(s)

Upon completion of this event, participants should be able to:

• List the five areas to focus on when tackling social justice issues.

Rinku Sen is a writer and social justice strategist. She is formerly the Executive Director of Race Forward and was Publisher of their award-winning news site Colorlines. Under Sen’s leadership, Race Forward generated some of the most impactful racial justice successes of recent years, including Drop the I-Word, a campaign for media outlets to stop referring to immigrants as “illegal,” resulting in the Associated Press, USA Today, LA Times, and many more outlets changing their practice. She was also the architect of the Shattered Families report, which identified the number of kids in foster care whose parents had been deported.

Her books Stir it Up and The Accidental American theorize a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race, gender, class, poverty, sexuality, and other systems. As a consultant, Rinku has worked on narrative and political strategy with numerous organizations and foundations, including PolicyLink, the ACLU and the Nathan Cummings Foundation. She serves on numerous boards, including the Women’s March, where she is Co-President and the Foundation for National Progress, publisher of Mother Jones magazine.